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tv   [untitled]    August 8, 2012 10:30am-11:00am PDT

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round to allow people to compare the two. i did not want to get in the middle of that discussion. supervisor campos: anything else? >> i understand there were some comments made about how you looked at over votes or how many ballots being cast. i did get an e-mail about some of the concerns. i did look through all of those. they are not needed for this report. it got away from what i was tasked to do it for the report. i was tasked to look at a very analytical point.
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why are people voting the way they are voting? that gets away from a statistical analysis. i did not include that information for that reason. i feel that we addressed what we could given the parameters the commission gave me. i have not had a chance to look at what was presented for the final point. it is always something we could do as a supplemental later on. supervisor campos: in terms of the point that mr. fried was making and you were talking about jurisdictions where they have elections that are tied to statewide offices, do you have any response to that? >> new york city, for example, has september elections and even years and odd years.
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the election for mayor, for example, there are no federal elections on the ballot. in minnesota, they use september elections in odd years. it seems to me including those is comparing apples to apples. in terms of the state primary, all i was suggesting was using the most recent 2012 data because you are already using state primary. you already have said in the report. it stopped at 2010. including 2012, it would make sense. it is the most recent data. you already have a category for statewide primaries. you include the u.s. senate, the governor, and those races.
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>> we use the primary only as an example. there is nowhere else i use the primary information in our report for -- i never looked out over votes in primaries at all. it just looks at primary's in general about 65% of winner- take-all. i could not use september's election if i wanted to keep that formats until i had november's numbers. >> if you think about it with a plurality election, if you compare everyone who votes for the top two, their ballots counted in the final round. everyone else who did not voted
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for those top two, it is similar to where their ballots has exhausted. it is this ironic thing that everyone is picking out exhausted ballots in making a deal at of its and not realizing that all races have exhausted balance. the people whose votes did not go to one of the top two the only have one choice. if you are going to into an analysis, which you only do in the appendix, it makes sense to extend that to other races. you will see these numbers are far higher than they are in contests. supervisor campos: that is a good point. >> what i have struggled with as i have been looking at this on that very item, you have a
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different electorate and the primary and a different elector it in the general. you cannot guarantee that someone who showed up in the primary, there is no way to go back. as someone moves or leaves, they are removed from the system. i cannot go back and analyze how they voted five years ago. you could try to come up with a way, but i struggled with that. there is no way to know but people showed up. if you had 100,000 people show up in june and you had 200,000 people show up in november, you do not know how many of those 100,000 people did not show up in november. i cannot find a good way to do it when i was being cast -- as i
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was being fair to the numbers. supervisor campos: from my perspective, it is helpful for us to get the information that staff has compiled to the relevant agencies. it is something that can form this discussion. i also know that there may be some additional questions along the lines that have been raised that could be included or issues that could be included as a part of the supplemental. my preference, and i defer to colleagues, would be to simply finalize something with the understanding that there will be additional conversations. i know commissioner avalos is very interested in this. i do think that this information is very useful in addressing
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some of the concerns that have been raised. in some respects, i see the benefit of getting the information out there. supervisor olague: at some point, and i know we are not in a position to make this request, but i think it would be great for the department of the elections to have the opportunity to give us feedback on these findings. supervisor campos: that goes to the point that it may be -- the way i see this is that this is a reports that based on feedback we get from the elections commission, from other members of the board of supervisors, there could be something additional that can be presented. i would expect that once something is presented, i wouldn't they would come back to
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us and ask some questions. >> -- i would hope they would come back to us and ask some questions. >> we can give this report to anyone you wish. i am happy do it. we cannot directly say we will come to present to you. they would have to invite us. supervisor campos: i do not know how you want to proceed. this is on the agenda as discussion and dyes and possible action item. -- discussion and a possible action item. if we move to accept this, it does not mean there is not additional supplemental work that cannot be added. is there any motion or
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recommendation? supervisor olague: i'd like to move that we basically approve this. we should use this as an informational piece so that people did to understand the basics of some of the findings. supervisor campos: we have a motion to except the report with the understanding that there would be supplemental work that would be done in conjunction with some of the folks that are here. commissioner shmeltzer: i would second that. it is an informational item and it is useful. all of this, i think, is useful for the public to get to understand better the more
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discussion and more information there is, the more people start to see different pieces of it. i think it is hard for people to understand all the implications. supervisor olague: i think it lends objectivity to the discussion. i think this is a good place to start. supervisor campos: in terms of clarifying what happens. once we accept this, this would be presented to the various agencies that would have some interest in this, whether the elections commission, what else? cut that would be up to you to decide -- >> that would be up to you to decide.
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i do not know if there is anyone else. supervisor campos: as part of accpeting, lafco staff can work with the chair? is that ok? one of the things we should also notes, there may be additional work that is done and additional information provided. , as we have any other comments or thoughts, can we take that motion without objection? i want to thank mr. fried for the workin. the work continues. i also want to thank mr. hill. and the other speakers.
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the last time we did a report on something, we had a report on the issue of garbage collection. that was also an ongoing effort. we put out a report and there was additional information provided. the hope here is that lafco can add to the ongoing discussion. i think it is important to get something out there with the understanding that it is not the end of the analysis. if you could please call item number 5. >> item #5 is public comment. supervisor campos: this is an opportunity for any member of the public to speak on any item that is not on the agenda. item number 6? >> item #6, future agenda items. supervisor campos: future agenda
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items? >> i wanted to make a quick note that we normally meet on the fourth friday of the month. next month, we will be taking a recess. we will be meeting again in september. supervisor campos: by that time, there will have been action. >> that would be my absolute hope, yes. supervisor campos: any member of the public wish to speak on this? >> item #7 is adjournment. supervisor campos: the meeting is a we wish everybody a happy friday and a good weekend. meeting adjourned.
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>> five years ago here in san francisco, and i was toque -- joking with the mayor that it only took us four years to realize the error of our ways and move back here. it did the warriors 41 years. on a day when the city is excited about the basketball team coming back, we are thrilled to have the mayor here to help us open our san francisco office. thank you very much for all you have done. want to hand it over to you. [applause] >> congratulations. i wanted to come by. my staff let me know the background and history of this
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company, and i'm very excited for it and not only wish you success, but it is our success as well as the success of the city to have you here. you're so glad to join our friends at pg&e as well as the department of the environment. their staff. we have some past commissioners as well that have served in various capacities. we are excited about clean energy, and we are excited about the reason you started here. actually started back in virginia, but you came back to san francisco, and we are excited to have you here. the model you have about the ability to communicate with people, using the social media platform, and getting kind of a personal relationship with our environment and with energy savings -- that excites us because it has been a challenge for us to talk to people. i know the department of the environment has had that challenge. how do you educate people about helping themselves as well as
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help the environment? the q you canuote -- you can quote all kinds of information, but it does not become relevant to their lives, and by old power having tools to allow -- to become personal, for me, it becomes personal. do you like tequila, or do you like champagne? [laughter] i happen to be a tequila guy, but anyway. that is part of the excitement here for the staff. i love your bike racks and the way you are conducting yourselves here and growing, and by the end of the year, talking about 75 or 80 people working here, that relevancy for my neighbors, me, the residents of the city, who actually, when you talk with them, they all want to do better. they live in a city where they
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want to feel they belong to the whole movement. that is why i moved to san francisco. there were a lot of movements i wanted to lead and others i wanted to join. when it comes to improvement of the environment, we want to be part of them -- the movement. we want to be part of the best city in the country. how do we get there? we personalize it. we go about every week. this is where we are saying what goes in the green and blue boxes, and we personalize our challenge making sure we know the things we use where it goes so we can get to the 100% recycling, zero ways. we talked about it to our friends in china. do you live in a city that is committed to zero ways? you are not up there yet. when it comes to energy efficiency, when it comes to clean tat, -- to clean tech, we
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would like to talk to people and make sure it is personal to them. that is why i am excited about personalizing it, making it relevant, creating a competitiveness to it, but also a friendly, social environment where people can say, "i am part of san francisco. this is what i do to live here." when we reduce energy consumption, that will meet other people and more people can live in our city. it becomes expensive and unaffordable if we do not start thinking about shared values and shared living standards. that is why i am also excited about the movement about our shared economy. you are part of that. we can reduce the footprint of our people, and more people can enjoy the richness of our city. i am year for all those reasons as well as what you mentioned earlier. they are coming back, and we get to celebrate that with you. five years from now, 3000
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employees here at full power celebrating an nba championship right in our water from rita. this will be great, right? first of all, thank you very much for being part of a great company. thank you for so many of you living in our city, and thank you, alex, and the whole staff for having such a great model for clean tech, energy- efficient, and thank you for partnering with the city. we will find those opportunities to partner with you. you have a great model, and we are going to search for ways to do that. already been educated about what i do not have, which is digital thermometers in my house. i have a baby thermometer. that is how i feel warm, but thank you very much, and congratulations for being part of a great, successful -- now i know why president obama came to you back in 2009. this is that great feeling. he had a vision there to share
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with you. i get to share that vision now, and hopefully in the next four years, we will do a lot of work together. congratulations. [applause] >> i want to introduce steve, the vp who oversees all of our work at piccinni, oversees the service is brought to you, who are customers of the utility -- all of our work at pg&e. thank you, steve. >> let me just say -- welcome to the neighborhood. thank you guys for choosing to come out here and join us in our home city. we are proud that you are here. we are proud to be part of this city and a partner with you and we look for to achieving those goals you laid out. we talked about making energy personal for our customers. you have to make it personal for it to have an impact on your
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life, and there's probably no better example of that then the relationship you have an old power and the work you help do for our customers. i heard this morning the commission from thecpuc -- the cpuc was making a speech, and she was happy to get her report and had one smiley face and was committed to getting to two. that is one great example of making it personal. there is the work we do with social. we have the opportunity to engage people. we have a passion. we give them the information so they can help accomplish their goals. there is another aspect of this, which is really important, which i wanted to thank you all for. i have talked to a lot of our other customers, some of whom are less fortunate in terms of their income and what they have the ability to do. they may be struggling on a monthly basis to pay their bills and to do the things they want
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to do in their lives. i was speaking to one customer in particular, who was excited to get their report because it helped start them on a journey to use less energy. they did simple things, they took civil actions, they became more aware, and as a result, they were saving about 20% on their bill. that has a huge impact on their life and what they can do. that is another way we can make it really personal, and that is another thing i get excited about. energy has the opportunity to power our lives and help us achieve our goals. i'm excited about where we can go with the partnership. again, thank you for joining us. thank you for the partnership. i know many of the folks in this office have probably work some late nights to deliver for us and deliver for our customers, and i want to thank you for all
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that commitment. i also want to say how happy we are to have you as a customer year in san francisco. i have a feeling you are probably one of our most efficient customers in san francisco. i saw your groupon, the facebook atp -- app to see how you were doing, and you kind of put us to shame. thanks, and welcome. >> thank you. to bank a few more people and provide more context for why we are opening this office here in san francisco, we started this company five years a po intrero hill with the notion -- in potr ero hill with the notion that most customers all over the world think energy is boring and the only time they think about it is when something does not work or when a bill comes that is unexpectedly high.
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we realize -- we thought, anyway, that if we provided people with more compelling information, took the phenomenal data that was coming into utilities, that we could begin to drive behavior change and drive changes in everyday lives of ordinary people. earlier this month, we celebrated having saved a tara what our of energy in partnership with utilities and customers. et al. what our of energy means practically nothing to anybody, but it is a lot of electricity, enough to power a city of 200,000 people for a whole year. what is just as exciting -- more exciting than saving the first taro hour of energy is we are going to save another tarawa of energy over the next 12 months. it took us five years to get to the first tarawa hour. it will take less than 12 months to get to the next. to put that in context another way, the entire solar industry in the u.s. produced around 1.7 tarawa hours of electricity last year.
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this small company in partnership with really phenomenal large companies is having an impact that is approximately 2/3 of that, and we feel like we are just getting started. i feel confident that our ability to have an impact will grow strongly because of the partnerships that the mayor has highlighted, the partnership with facebook. the partnership with honeywell. to be imagine the thermostat. particularly the partnership we have with utilities like pg&e. i think there is someone here from the city of palo alto utilities, and we have worked with for a long time. utilities like back -- you guys are brave. utilities have had the same business model and the same basic delivery for a very long time. to recognize and appreciate that your customers could become real partners is a really brave thing to do in an industry that has been understandably risk
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averse before. we are thrilled to be your partner in that change and to be providing better services and tools to your customers, to give them more control and in doing so, to build a stronger relationship and help them save. the one thing i wanted to thank were our partners. the second group to thank is government. diane is here. she was commissioner on the puc. have beenn 0 fromrdc -- we have people from nrdc. thanks of great regulation -- regulation gets a bad name these days, but when implemented correctly, it can be a phenomenal force for good, and
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the state of california has led the way. local governments -- this is a phenomenal city to do business in a, a city which has attracted and under the mayor's leadership accelerated the attraction of other tech companies and built an ecosystem. when you want to start a business, you want to open an office, you need to go to where the talent is, and there is not a city in the world that has more talented people than the city of san francisco. we are thrilled to be here and to have your leadership. i do not know if we will be at 3000 employees, but if the warriors win the championship, we will be there to celebrate and to help in any way we can. we look forward to being a long- term partner of yours and the city's for years to come. of course, the third group to thank here it is it is great to have a beautiful office, but
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what's most important it are the people who come in every day. i feel phenomenally blessed to have such wonderful colleagues. we started two of us at a desk five years ago. there are now 250 of us that the company. 50 people worked out of this office. we plan to double that in the next 12 months. the mayor already met our lead recruiter are here. when president obama came to visit our offices in virginia, we were 60 people. we told him we would double the company in 12 months, and he went to donny and said, "i understand you are the job czar." and she was, and we did. it is really special to be part of a community of people who are incredibly talented, who are hard working and who work those late nights and come from different industries to work together on such an important
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issue, an important issue for our city, an important issue for the state, and an important issue for the planet. really appreciate you guys all coming to celebrate our opening of this office. i know there is a ribbon for us to cut. i am ready to cut it. [applause]

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